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Article Date : 20 July 2012
Article Author : Chris Jones


Phra Kru Beung Phraya Suren

Chao Phraya Suren Rachsena was a son of Phraya Montri and a nephew of Chao Phraya Bodin  (Sing Singhaseni), the defense minister and regent of King Rama III. He was also the founder of the Singhaseni Family
 

He was one of the most important officials during the reign of King Rama V and was rewarded as many as 4,000-rai land from the king. 

He donated 48-rai land to establish a temple called “Wat Beung Praya Suren”, which was officially authorized as a legal temple in B.E.2431. 

Later he was ordained at the same temple, where he practiced mediation and learnt Dharma. 


It is known that he created a series of amulets in accordance with Buddhist belief that creating such images is a form of making merit. These amulets are now known as Phra Somdej Beung Phraya Suren and were blessed in BE 2433 by Luang Phor Thong of Wat Rajyotha, a highly venerated monk

The majority of these amulets were hidden in two separate Kru, one below a sacred chedi, and the other under the Chairman Buddha Image.

Luang Phor Daeng Singhaseni, his nephew, had said that Chao Phrya Suren had learnt many sacred sciences from monks of the era, who also donated sacred soils, powder and oils to create the amulets.
 


In B.E.2485 Luang Phor Klum, a former abbot of Wat Bung Phraya suren discovered the secret kru below the chedi. These amulets were removed and donated to Marshal Plak Pibulsongkram, then Thai Prime Minister.

These amulets were distributed to troops serving in the Indochinese war and by all accounts it would appear that many lives were saved as a result of wearing these sacred pims. 

In B.E.2512, the amulets in the Kru under the Chairman Buddha Image were discovered and given away to worshippers, who had supported the renovation of the temple. 
 

About 5,000 amulets were discovered in total making these now very rare pims, much sought after by collectors.



It is also important to note that although the majority of these amulets had plain backs but some of the Niyom series were hand engraved with a katha, and these are the rarest. The katha reads  “Ti Ti U Ni” along with other sacred signs. 

This particular somdej features the hand engraved katha on the reverse.

The majority of these pims are not in what would be considered perfect condition and this is par for this particular amulet. However this example is in beautiful condition and a great purchase.